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Step 1- Catch your horse and perform the necessary steps to get the horse ready for riding. Whether that includes English or Western saddles, blankets, wraps, or anything else; that’s up to you.
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Step 2- When your horse is ready to ride, untie him from the hitching post or fence. Pull the reins over his head and cross them at the horn of the saddle.
Step 3- On the left side of your horse, face the horse’s side and grab the reins with your left hand.
Step 4- Put your left foot in the left stirrup and place your right hand on the back of the saddle.
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Step 5- With the reins in your left hand; grab the saddle horn with your left hand as well. Hold tightly to both the saddle horn and the back of the saddle.
Step 6- Bounce twice, or three times, with your right foot to gain some momentum and pull yourself up to a standing position with your left foot in the stirrup and your right foot up next to it.
Step 7- Swing your right foot over the horse’s hindquarters, being careful not to hit the horse.
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Step 8- Lean over to your right and make sure your right foot is in the right stirrup. Gather the reins in your left hand and you are ready to ride.
*Tips*
* Make sure that if it your first time mounting a horse, you have a horse that is going to stand still. A horse that takes off when your feet leave the ground will make this a much harder process. If you don’t have access to a reliable horse, have someone stand at the horse’s head so he/ she will not take off.
*Make sure your have the saddle cinched tightly because if it isn’t, your saddle will slip and you will tumble. (Personal experience)
*If your horse is tall, or you are short, it is always helpful to use a mounting block to give you some extra height.
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*Common Mistakes*
*Trying to mount the horse from the right side. (Wrong!) Always mount from the left.
*Grabbing the saddle horn with your right hand. (Wrong!) Always grab the saddle horn with your left hand.
*Hitting the horse as your swing your leg over their hindquarters. (Wrong!) If this happens your horse might get scared and bolt, therefore, throwing you to the ground.